Suppressed Soundtracks: Tracking Camp Trajectory in American Queer Cinema’s Music, from Kubrick to Tarantino

“For now, it was lovely music that came to my aid. There was a window open with the stereo on, and I viddied right at once what to do.” ~ Alex DeLarge, A Clockwork Orange In Stanley Kubrick’s dystopian, totalitarian 1971 picture A Clockwork Orange, a musical motif is enough to incite violence – one movement of Beethoven’s “Symphony No.9 in D Major” enough to … Continue reading Suppressed Soundtracks: Tracking Camp Trajectory in American Queer Cinema’s Music, from Kubrick to Tarantino

Grim, Gyroscopic Apocalypse: Explicating W.B. Yeats’ “The Second Coming”

“And I stood upon the sand of the sea, and saw a beast rise up out of the sea…”                                                                                                             ~ Revelation, 13:1 In Poetry Magazine’s May 1914 issue, Ezra Pound unpacks William Butler Yeats’ late-career progression – particularly the Irishman’s shift into what Pound deems a “gaunter” voice – his work “seeking greater harshness of outline.” At the time, Yeats had not … Continue reading Grim, Gyroscopic Apocalypse: Explicating W.B. Yeats’ “The Second Coming”

“A Roman Wilderness of Pain”: The Doors, Wagner, The Rolling Stones and Western Escapism in the Postmodern, Warring World of Apocalypse Now

“We’ll have ourselves a hellavuh airstrike tonight. A lightshow. How do you like The Doors’: ‘C’mon Baby Light My Fire’?” ‘…I like it.’ “I love it.” ‘You’re crazy.’     ~ Col. Walter Kurtz and Capt. Benjamin Willard, Apocalypse Now, Screenplay (1979) It begins in a hellish firestorm. Vietnamese tree-lines fill with fluorescent yellow smoke; their foreign soil engulfed by American napalm. Accompanying the inferno: the … Continue reading “A Roman Wilderness of Pain”: The Doors, Wagner, The Rolling Stones and Western Escapism in the Postmodern, Warring World of Apocalypse Now

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A White-Het Savior, Risen from the Mean, Masculine Streets of Philadelphia: Bruce Springsteen’s Queer Empathy and Its Cinematically Allusive, Filmic Form

“This guy, call him Bruce – no he’s not a queer, thank God, sir – will be a national hero.”                                                                             ~ Jefferson Morely, Rolling Stone, Oct. 1985. “…My … Continue reading A White-Het Savior, Risen from the Mean, Masculine Streets of Philadelphia: Bruce Springsteen’s Queer Empathy and Its Cinematically Allusive, Filmic Form

Gays and Gardenias: Hollywood’s Queer Representation Regression

“What’s a faggot?” ‘A faggot is…a word used to make gay people feel bad.’ A beat. “Am I a faggot?”                                                                                          ~ Little and Juan, in Moonlight (2016) A gasp? Sure. A tear? Probably. A yawn? Maybe. A laugh? You wouldn’t think so – but, apparently, the above sequence from Barry Jenkins’ heartrending film Moonlight, despite its emotional tension, can elicit reactionary laughter … Continue reading Gays and Gardenias: Hollywood’s Queer Representation Regression

On Planes, Trains, and Self-driving Automobiles

We used to talk of getting out, leaving what was left of our souls to find themselves without us and to wander between the walls that never listened, only heard our talk only heard our desire only took our voices. We used to drive for a while, In the cold minutes between class and rooms that wanted only to teach to educate to catch to … Continue reading On Planes, Trains, and Self-driving Automobiles